"The American National Game of Baseball, Grand Match at Elysian Fields," by Currier and Ives, 1866. From the Library of Congress.

For One Week in 1867, Detroit Was the Center of the Baseball World

Long before it was known as the Paris of the Midwest, and more than a decade before it claimed its first major league team, Detroit set its sights on becoming the center of baseball—at least for a week. Just two years after the end of the Civil War, the city made its mark on the new sport by hosting the “World Base Ball Tournament.”

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Allou Trammaker

They were mirror images of each other, Trammell and Whitaker, Whitaker and Trammell, one white, the other black; one a left-handed hitter, the other right; one a second baseman, the other a shortstop; one as quiet as a tree, the other, as the old line goes, would talk to a tree–different but exactly the same, too. Good fielders, good baserunners, underrated, beloved, lifetime Detroit Tigers.

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Charlie Maxwell

Required Reading: How Tigers’ Charlie Maxwell became ‘Sunday Charlie,’ One Sabbath Blast at a Time

During his career, Maxwell hit 40 of his 148 homers — or 27% — on Sunday. “There are unusual things that happen in baseball and I guess my Sunday homers are one of them,” says Maxwell, 92, from his home on Maple Lake in Paw Paw, where he lives with his wife Ann.  Married 69 years, the couple has four children, 14 grandchildren, and three great grandchildren, all of whom live nearby.

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